CEO of Communities In Schools of the Midlands Responds to School Reopening Plans

For 32 years Communities In Schools of the Midlands (CISM) has supported students and families through hardships and uncertainty. During the unprecedented time we are experiencing with the COVID-19 pandemic, CISM is even more committed to ensuring that the needs of our most vulnerable population is met.

We understand that this is a difficult time for our communities and stand in support of our school district leaders as they work tirelessly to create a plan to safely integrate our students back into the classrooms. Our staff will continue to participate in community discussions and serve on district committees to advocate and ensure that the voices of our students and families are heard. 

With Hope,
Tanika D. Epps 

Communities In Schools ® National President Rey Saldaña Responds to National Learning Loss in USA Today Article

Coronavirus Has Changed School Forever, Let’s Make It An Improvement

As an unprecedented academic year grinds to an end, with schools shuttered and millions of children learning remotely in every state, education leaders face the daunting task of preparing for a fall reopening with no end to the pandemic in sight. Back to school will not be back to normal. But neither should it be a return to business as usual. Arne Duncan and Rey Saldaña shared this story in their opinion article in a recent USA Today article.

photo credits: Communities In Schools ®

As Rey and Arne write, as we embark on our nationwide effort to reenter school buildings, we must determine not just how far apart desks need to be, whether attendance should be staggered, and how often to sanitize facilities. We must also ask how we can build an education system that gives every child in every U.S. community the opportunity to learn and succeed. A system better than the one we left behind in the time before COVID-19 and before George Floyd’s horrific death at the hands of Minneapolis police catalyzed waves of protest across the nation against injustice and structural inequality. 

Unprecedented times need unprecedented change

A moment when we are experiencing a national health emergency and nationwide discontent may seem like exactly the wrong time to propose a bold new direction in American public education. But the coronavirus has changed everything, and the Floyd protests have shone a light on inequity inherent to all our systems, including education. 

The only way to adequately respond to both moments is to transform K–12 learning for good. Doing so will require a significant federal investment in education. The costs will certainly be high, but the long-term price of inaction will be even higher. 

An utter lack of leadership and guidance from Washington on how states and school districts should move forward with the virus continuing to circulate is a hurdle. But local leaders across America have shown boundless creativity in the months since schools started closing their doors. They’ve done their best to find new ways to educate, feed, and support students and stay connected to families. 
Read more about how we can create a better education system for our children and the generations to come, click here

Article Credits: Communities In Schools ® National Communications, July 25, 2020